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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN 5
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
in foreign policy, you highlight the threat from home grown terror, from self-radicalized extremists. you suggest that the government should, one, intervene in areas between radical beliefs and violent behaviours. it should instill trust in communities where alienation is likely and integrate a whole of government approach that embodies u.s. values, can you give us the short version. >> possessing radical beliefs is protected by our constitution. that is what freedom. speech and association is about. the first amendment to our constitution. it's a core value of the united states, one which many aspire to have and observe. that's all fine. what is not fine is when possessing radical beliefs inspires the person with those beliefs, or someone he or she talks to to engage in violence behaviour. that is not protected by the constitution. the difficult challenge for government is to know when to intervene to prevent somebody from harming the rest of us, just because that person has radical beliefs. that intervention area is hard to identify. the danger is that you end up suppressing people's fr
for that few years at the state department was best gift. >> the mix of foreign policy to describe her time in state and seem to all agree he was a more cautious secretary of state. but i think that can stem from a number of things. i think she by nature is a more cautious person and maybe thinking about 2016 and also could have been a lot of pressure from the administration to be cautious. i'm with luke, i think the american people have short term memories and b i don't think foreign policy is on their radar. if you look at things they care about, foreign policy is nowhere on that list. they only care with foreign policy as it connects to the economy. if anything, her time at state will benefit her. if you can picture her on the debate stage with chris christie, who doesn't have any foreign policy experience. if you look at it that way, i think it only benefits her. i think benghazi is not going to define her legacy long term. >> speaking of benghazi, there's something we need to compare, the two secretaries of state that preceded her, you find they had several ben gazdyes and it's worth n
pockets. china and egypt at the same foreign policies toward the pressing issues and amenities. both have been working to push forward a two state solution for the palestinian israeli conflict base of the nineteen sixty seven borders and they support a political solution for this are in crisis the look. she had the time she will walk in with goals he resigns to peaceful solution. the results you email it to accomplish. no one will win. the serum people would suffer a loss both the opposition the government to cdm in geneva to implement the resolutions of june you will want oh emphasize on china's bizarre to expand the already increasing exports to egypt. but twelve economic ties are strengthening. some analysts believe the current buyback or religions are not satisfactory. would it didn't cost us three dollars due respect to china supports all you have all of the time that's variations does not see that the star of the ties between the two nations. we asked the owner looking forward to morning mass demands more terrorists egypt is now revising these foreign policy and upstream from the ti
-- american citizens take government officials who nor this reality when they pushed their foreign-policy agendas based on this. guest: thank you for your question and i disagree with your premise, which is that the world trade center was an inside job with explosives. there are the studies out there and it is pretty clear that the -- those buildings were attacked by planes that were hijacked by al qaeda operatives. i know there is a continuing conspiracy theory community out there that think this was some sort of nefarious scheme to -- it is hard to take of things seriously. i know you may genuinely believe it but i encourage you to go out there and engage in debates. i don't think the conspiracy theory holds any water. host: maurice from ohio, democrat's line. i have a question about -- let's sayear tomorrow they have a nuclear bomb. whatd of want to know would be the consequence, what the world would do about it as compared to pakistan having a nuclear bone, india having a nuclear bomb. what will the u.s. or the rest of the world do if iran says they have a nuclear bomb today? that is
, joining us from bethesda, maryland. thank you for being with us on c-span. the foreign-policy initiative discusses secretary of state john kerry's tenure so far. and the overall foreign-policy challenges the foreign -- obama faces.tration lac and we will talk about supreme court judges. and genetically modified foods with new york university professor marian nussle. we will look for your reaction by phone, e-mail, and twitter. tonight, republican senator rand paul of kentucky speaking at the detroit economic club about jobs and the economy. former secretaries of state madeleine albright and hillary clinton come a remembering south african president nelson mandela. and a white house briefing with secretary jay carney. >> the book affairs events from washington, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house event, briefings, and conferences. and complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house. we are c-span, created by the cable tv industry and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now you can watch us in hd. >> republican senator rand paul at the detroit ec
you think, share your thoughts on obama foreign policy with other fox news sundayviewers on twitter at sundayviewers on twitter at #fns. this is the quicksilver cash back card from capil one. it's not the "limit the cash i earnvery month" card. it's not the "i only earn decent rewards at the gas station" card. it's the no-games, no-signing up, everyday-rewarding, kung-fu-fighting, silver-lightning-in-a-bottle, bringing-home-the-bacon cash back card. this is the quicksilver card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on eve purchase, everywhere, every single day. so ask yourself, what's in your wallet? >>> critics in this country and the middle east continue to question the nuclear deal the u.s. and its allies worked out with iran. and there is increasing concern about the new air defense zone that china has declared over disputed territory in the east china sea. joining me now to discuss this and more, former cia and nsa director michael hayden, and, general, welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> good morning, chris. >> do you look at the new six-month deal with iran as a rea
a tougher stand on foreign policy issues to shore up his popularity, and the senkakku islands or the diaoyu island islands dispute is very sensitive in chine ha. leaders cannot afterward to be weak in dealing with japan or the united states. >> biden's visit is seen as tangible evidence of the u.s. pivot. it's a strategy recovering from the recent debacle at the apec meeting of regional leaders, a meeting that the u.s. president withdrew from at the last minute because of his domestic budget crisis, leaving an assertive china to fill the void. >> after president obama pulled oust his visit, it was up to biden to play catch up. ease tensions and a reminder that america is still a pacific power. >> one of the hezbollah senior leaders was killed in beirut. he was shot outside his home. the armed group says he survived several attempts on his life and a 2006 war with israel. let's join andrew simmonds, live from beirut. >> tell us about who lakis was and the circumstances of his death. >> well, the attack took place outside his home, as you said there, he was driving back from work around midni
by giving speeches, what's the danger there? >> there was concern as he reached out in the foreign policy area. presidents send to do that. what is different about obama is that i think probably at least since fdr he has pushed the limits of executive authority on domestic matters to the limits. on immigration reform he's decided not to and all welfare laws, education, anti-drug laws, he has simply decided not to enforce divisions of the law and the biggest example is obama care where the employer mandate was delayed a year. if you like your insurance, you get to keep it well. turns out the law says, no, you can't. so he directed the state incidents to direct the insurance companies to go ahead and provide the same policies they had had before and also there's no subsidy provided for the federal exchanges as there is the state exchange and these are a lot of examples that more than any recent president has pushed his power to the limit, thus raising the question about whether he is upholding himself to faith fully execute the laws. >> the president has made an announcement, members of con
to our foreign policy series discussion on the recently signed interim agreement between iran and the p5 plus germany and geneva. we have gathered a distinguished panel of experts who will walk us through what just happened and what may lie ahead. headlines during the last 48 hours have run the entire spectrum from victory for iran obamastoric mistake to achieves historic measure. most comments have followed what has become a redeemable republican/democrat divide, but recent polls indicate that nearly 2/3 of all americans support an agreement with iran at would lift sanctions for iran in return for tehran restricting its nuclear program. what is undeniable is that there are many layers to this cake, and we look forward to hearing from our panelists as they discuss whether the agreement brings new hope for nuclear negotiations with iran or further disappointment. our panelists are no strangers to the world affairs council audiences. we welcome back all three. ambassador john bloomberg is professor at the united -- professor of international affairs at the united states naval academy -- am
of for the healthcare.gov. should he fire someone? on foreign policy, a tweet -- he will be up on capitol hill to testify about that. there are headlines about that deal. the financial times this morning. is in chinasident and has met with japanese leaders as well. dianne feinstein and robert --endez vice president biden meeting on with asian leaders. we are talking about healthcare.gov. it somebody be fired over its failures? pennsylvania. republican. caller: good morning. i feel that the obama care fiasco has been ruining many people. my son, for instance. 62 years old -- he signed up for security and about two days later he got a letter that he had no more insurance. this is wrong. it is happening to everybody. the insurance companies must be relishing this problem. i think he is wrong and they do that he talks on both sides of his mouth. he tells us one thing and he knows he is going to do something else. i think he has been so unfair to a lot of the american public. i don't think he knows the constitution -- he does not believe in it. i am just so sorry for my son and my other children. i
because its proxy, hezbollah, carries out its foreign policy. his lolba has continuously attacked israel over the decades and is instrumental in fighting the coalition of syrian revolution forces. it's a rebel group which the u.s. recognizes as a legitimate representative of the syrian people. let us not forget iran's intrusion on u.s. soil. the iranian hostage try crisis of 1979 began with an attack on and subsequent occupation of the u.s. emmascy. 52 americans were held hostage for 444 days. the attack had the support of iran's then-leader, ayatollah khomeini. it was a clear violation of international diplomatic protocol. the iranian president mea several years -- claims that their nuclear program is for peaceful pump, saying iran's only desire is to diversify its energy production capabilities. yet iran has not only refused to reverse course on enriching uranium, they have developed faster.enrich uranium recently freshman members of the foreign affair committees sent a bipartisan letter to president obama telling him to be vigilant in diplomatic actions with iranis. any diplomatic dis
critic much russia's policy towards ukraine. but sergei lavrov, the russian foreign minister is here, and yesterday he condemned what he called n.a.t.o. inference into the domestic matters of the you grain. meanwhile, as you can see behind me the protest in independent square continues. there's a question, a doubt about momentum. people can carry on turning out in their thousands as they have been doing. ultimately they need a clear idea of their objectives, what they are trying to achieve and how they can achieve it. i'm not sure that they have that. that's why the ukrainian government policy may be to sit this thing out. >> barnaby phillips reports from kiev. a shift from protests on the streets of thailand. they paused demonstrations out of respect for the kings birthday. >> this was a day to fill the streets and put politics aside. tens of thousands of thais came out to see their beloved king. >> translation: i'm happy to celebrate his birthday. it makes me happy to see him. i wish he would be with us forever. >> as each year passes concern grows about the 8 six-year-old. he made
surprising me coming back to the world of politics after the last five years as editor of foreign policy magazine is just how super charged this conversation is. and everybody -- wants to view -- that's, by the way why i think it's so important what john said. we are here to do independent reporting. and, you know, i hope that callers and viewers and readers can look at it for what it is. it's an important part of the documentary record, i think. it's interesting to hear what the cabinet members have to say on the perspective on the white house. what does it mean? you know there's a famous joke about the chinese when asked by nixon about the french revolution he's waiting to see how it turn out. i think we're waiting to see how the obama administration turns out. >> caller: hi. my question is when are you all going have ever print anything good about obama? because he has done than you have given him credit for. [inaudible] the situation -- [inaudible] paying taxes. and not getting -- representation and too many
from georgetown university, was a chief foreign policy adviser for the majority leader of the senate, senator daschle, that's were i met den denis. then the deputy national street adviser in the white house and the chief of staff for the president of the united states. please welcome denis mcdonough. [applause] >> angood morning and let me sa, let me say thanks to georgetown university and arent fox from this form on the affordable care act. let me say thanks to the great sin of the northern flank, senator dorgan answered daschle. senator daschle has been a very important mentor to me for the opportunity to be here. senator bennet, good to see you again as well. i appreciate the opportunity to talk about the affordable care act, what it's done and what it will do. and i want to update you this point on the progress we've made on fixing the website, affordable carhealthcare.gov. before talk about the law and its benefits, let me just take about to visit i made to the emergency room on a friday night recently. with one of my boys after he broke his left arm. they care was excellent, as
approach to foreign policy. netanyahu has said recently, rouhani has an iron fist sheathed by a velvet glove. rouhani was a nuclear negotiator, and he even bragged that he had used at the cover to advance iran's nuclear efforts. while he may be president, he is not the supreme leader, which is khamenei. the guy who at the end of the day really controls the shots is ali khamenei. rouhani was chosen by a special, very small group that khamenei had picked. they chose acceptable candidates within a narrow band of political thought. i think people do, people i work with look forward to the day when people in iran have a genuine choice between alternatives politically, but they are a long way from it. to your point, in terms of how much wiggle room rouhani has, the iranians have two big goals. >> you can watch the rest of this online at the c-span video library. we will move onto the willard hotel for remarks by secretary of state on kerry at the brookings institution save and -- brookingsisrael forum onon save anban u.s.-israel relations. >> thank you for the generous introduction and for t
with the opposition leader. there are other foreign ministers. they are outspoken critics of russian policy towards ukraine. interestingly sergei lavrov, the russian foreign minister is here, they are port of the osce. the meeting has begun. it's not a meeting specifically about ukraine, but you would imagine that ukraine and the crisis here is bound it feature and there'll be different approaches round that table to what's happening here and what may happen next. >> barnaby, thank you for keeping us up to date on the situation there. thousands of people are risking their lives to make their way across the mediterranean sea to europe in the hope of a better life. hundreds have died as we reported here. more people are using a spanish enclave as a stepping stone. >> as soon as the gates open a rush of people flood back and forth between here and more o y okayo. a few metres separate the rest of africa from the gateway. more okayans coming through the border do to legally. many will do what they say. this side you are an spanish soil. it's beyond the med terrianian sea that people want to get to. >>
of all for the bank of england, -- not least of all for the bank of england, monetary policy. he might have something about the foreign ownership, a banner issue in london. you being tax on the sale of your ownership if you're a foreign owner. something to do with -- this is the politics of politics. going up against the opposition chancellor saying plan a worked. didn't really work or have things gotten better? they have, thankfully. there will be politics in the houses of parliament, the house of westminster behind me. for married couples. there could be a sting in the tail from foreign owners. 11:15 london time. one day late. much, ourou so markets and are manus cranny. we will bring you chancellor osborne's autumn statement at 11:15 london time. followed by the bank of england rate decision at noon london time, you can watch both here on bloomberg. american brands opening their doors and london. the latest is how where company westbound -- homeware come in the west elm. caroline hyde went to met the ceo. u.k. the talk of the economy turning around. >> yes, we had j.crew coming as w
of state schultz and others, former senate foreign relations chairman dick lugar were pushing very strongly for a different policy. >> they were. they knew the veto was a mistake. right after that secretary schultz moved to redescribe anc not as terrorist organization and open up contacts with the group in osaka. >> you were on the ground when he came out -- >> after he came out. >> moved into the negotiations which were critical. >> went up and down in 1992, had a break in the negotiations, a serious break over violence. the two presidents, the two leaders, nelson mandela and f.w. de klerk came together, one of the things they agreed, which is a lesson for other peace processes that thereafter to acts of violence would be allowed to interrupt the peace process. the spoilers would not be allowed to do that. it was important because there was a lot of violence after that. >> that was also true of the northern ireland peace process. that was a key point they could not veto an agreement forward, a lesson not learned by israeli-palestinians sadly. what do you think was the special quality in ne
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)